AI, Algorithms & ChatGPT: What are the Competition Law Risks?

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AI, Algorithms & ChatGPT: What are the Competition Law Risks?

AI, Algorithms & ChatGPT: What are the Competition Law Risks?

About the speakers
  • Miranda Cole
    Miranda Cole
    Partner at Norton Rose Fulbright
    Miranda Cole is an antitrust and competition lawyer based in Brussels. She has a broad competition practice focused on the technology and life sciences sectors. With more than 20 years' experience, Miranda is regarded as a key adviser to life sciences and technology companies globally. Miranda has extensive experience advising clients to address increasing regulatory scrutiny from governments and competition authorities. She advises on merger control, actions under Articles 101 and 102 TFEU, abuse of dominance, anticompetitive agreements, and compliance and advisory work, as well as actions before the European courts in Luxembourg. Miranda is also heavily involved in supporting clients in aligning their competition policy engagement in response to a variety of new regulatory frameworks. Prior to joining the firm, Miranda was a senior partner in a multinational law firm in Brussels
  • Ajinkya M Tulpule
    Ajinkya M Tulpule
    General Counsel at bitFlyer Group
    Ajinkya is a global Fintech and Antitrust lawyer. He specialises in the development of regulatory regimes in countries outside the EU and their alignment with EU competition law principles. He has over 10 years’ experience in FinTech, Technology, Blockchain and Artificial Intelligence matters with top tier law firms, leading regulators such as the Financial Conduct Authority as well as cutting edge in-house teams. He has also restructured regulators and led strategic transformation projects across the EMEA and APAC. His client base includes Central Banks, regulators, Fortune 100 companies as well as start-ups. Ajinkya’s paper on the use cases of Blockchain technology for enforcement and compliance was recognised by the OECD the very first to explore this space.
  • Antonio Capobianco
    Antonio Capobianco
    Acting Head, Competition Division at OECD Competition Division
    Antonio Capobianco is a Senior Competition Expert with the OECD Competition Division. In this position he is responsible for the proceedings of the OECD Competition Committee. At the moment he is Acting Head of the OECD Competition Division where he has coordinated a series of OECD projects and work streams, including the development of the 2009 Guidelines for Fighting Bid Rigging in Public Procurement and the related OECD Council Recommendation of 2012, the work on transparency and procedural fairness, on SOEs and competitive neutrality, and most recently he has been leading the work on international enforcement co-operation. He has authored numerous Background Notes of the Secretariat on a variety of competition law enforcement and policy topics. Prior to joining the OECD in 2007, Mr Capobianco was a Counsel in the Competition Department of WilmerHale LLP, based in Brussels. He also spent three years with the Italian Competition Authority. Mr Capobianco authored several articles on antitrust issues published on major international law journals specialized in competition law and he co-authored textbooks on Italian and European competition law and economics. He regularly speaks at international conferences on antitrust and regulation issues. Mr. Capobianco graduated in law at the L.U.I.S.S. - Guido Carli in Rome and holds LL.M. degrees from the Law School of the New York University and from the Institute of European Studies of the Université Libre de Bruxelles.
  • Pedro Hinojo
    Pedro Hinojo
    Head of Information Society Services at Comisión Nacional de los Mercados y la Competencia (CNMC)
    Pedro Hinojo is an Economist working at CNMC (Spanish Commission on Markets and Competition) as the Head of the Information Society Unit in the Competition Directorate, in charge of competition policy in digital, telecom, media, intellectual property and other related sectors. Previously he had worked in the Research Unit, focused on digital markets, sharing economy, telecoms, financial sector and general advocacy and compliance issues. He has worked in other areas of the public sector related to economic analysis and economic policy. He has several publications in these fields and academic experience.

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